Wednesday, 25 July 2012

Curried Tomato Soup - with Canning directions

WARNING!!  THIS RECIPE IS NOT USDA APPROVED!  I HAVE BEEN WARNED THAT MY FOOD COULD CAUSE DEATH!  CAN AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!

There.  That's done.

Ok - so I love Heidi Swanson's recipe for Indian Spiced Tomato Soup.  It's a bit blah on it's own, but top it with the stir-ins below and it is fantastic!!!!  Seriously, you have to have the coconut milk at least, but I try to have them all on hand to serve.  But, there are a few changes that need to be made to be able to can safely. I changed the amount of onions, no water, and also no butter - hard to can.  But the spices are the same, so it still tastes about right.

Here is my altered version:

4 qts. tomatoes (skinned, seeded (if desired), crushed - I don't bother with skinning or seeding)
4C chopped onion
1.5T curry powder
1.5 teaspoon coriander
1.5 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon salt (more to taste)
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Sweat the onions with 1C water (do not use oil or butter) until tender.  Add tomatoes and spices and  simmer 20 minutes or until slightly thickened.  Liquify in a food processor, blender or with an immersion blender, if desired. (I crushed my tomatoes and onions in the food processor, so I didn't need to blend mine again)

Pour into hot jars, leave 1" headspace.  Process in a pressure canner: Pints - 20 minutes at 10lbs, Quarts 25min @ 10lbs..

To Serve:
Heat soup to a simmer serve over cooked brown rice, barley, etc.  Have these on hand to serve on top:
  • hard boiled eggs, chopped
  • cilantro, chopped
  • toasted slivered/sliced almonds
  • coconut cream (open a can of full-fat coconut milk without shaking it - scoop the thick cream from the top of the can)
  • lemon or lime wedges

Tuesday, 24 July 2012

Spaghetti Sauce with Meat

Adapted from the Blue Ball Book to use less meat and more tomatoes.  This is a double batch, about 9-10 quarts, depending on how much you simmer it down.


5lbs ground meat
4C chopped onions
2C chopped green peppers
25C chopped/crushed tomatoes
24oz tomato paste
1/4C brown sugar
1/4C dried parsley
3 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/4C apple cider vinegar

  1. Brown ground beef in a 3 gal. pot.  Drain.  add onions and peppers and sautee until tender.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and simmer until desired thickness (about an hour and mine was thick enough to stand up my wooden spoon)
  3. Ladle into hot jars, leaving 1" head space.
  4. Process in a pressure canner at 10lbs - Pints, 1 hour.  Quarts, 1 hour fifteen minutes

Sunday, 22 July 2012

Kara's Blue Ball Salsa

This recipe is basically the one from the Blue Ball Canning Book - but I got it from Kara, and she and I have both made notes and changes, so here it is!


10C crushed tomatoes (peeled and seeded if you like - I don't do it)
5C chopped tomatoes
5C onions, chopped
2.5C jalapenos, seeded and chopped
6 cloves garlic
1/2C cilantro, chopped
3 teaspoons salt
1.25C apple cider vinegar

  1. Combine ingredients, simmer 10 minutes.
  2. Process in boiling water bath - Pints or quarts, 15 minutes.
Last year I only used 1C jalapenos, and the salsa was quite mild, but had great flavor.  I drained the juices off the vegetables to make it thicker. 

Last year I skinned & seeded the tomatoes, then drained my veggies ot make my salsa thicker.  It wasn't all that thick adn I got 3.5 quarts.

This year I did not skin or seed my tomatoes, and I did not drain the veggies.  I got 5.5 quarts.  You decide.

Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Garden's Bounty - Summer Bean Salad



So, I've been trying to come up with ways to eat dry beans in summer.  Everyone knows that beans and rice are a super great meal (unless you're carb restricted).  They are:
  • low fat
  • low GI
  • extremely filling
  • a complete protein without meat
  • very inexpensive
  • easy to prepare
But in the summer, it's just not fun to sit down to a steaming bowl of soup beans.  It's way different than, for instance, hot grilled chicken, or hot spaghetti - something about eating all that hot liquid just makes you sweat.  That's why we eat beans in the winter time!

So, I've had "black bean and corn salad" and this is really just a thrown together version of that.  I used a bag of 15 bean soup (without the packet of gross seasoning) and lots of produce from my garden.  I really enjoyed the different flavors and textures of all those beans.  And I had way more ideas for ingredients that I would love to add if I had them!  I'll list them at the bottom of the recipe. 

Enjoy a filling, low fat, fresh and cool bean salad for dinner, as a side dish, leftovers for lunch - anytime!

Summer Bean Salad
1lb bag of beans (I used 15 bean mix, but black beans are a natural here)
1 ripe tomato, chopped (or 2 if you're a big fan)
1 cucumber, quartered and chopped
2 cobs corn, cut off the cob (or about 1C frozen, thawed)
1 bell pepper, chopped
1 large can black olives, chopped or sliced
salt & pepper to taste
about 1/2C balsamic vinegrette

  1. Cook your beans - rince and sort out any bad beans, then cover with about 2 inches water.  Add some salt - stirring it in later will help, but it's not quite the same.  Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer until beans are done.  It will be a shorter time than for bean soup, and you want the beans to hold their shape, not go mushy.  Mine needed about 1.5 hours or so.  Set a timer to start checking them early.   
  2. Drain in a colander, spread the beans up the sides and set the colander on a plate and put it in the fridge until cold.  Mine got about 2 hours and were cold enough.
  3. Chop all your veggies
  4. Pour the beans, veggies, seasonings and dressing in a large bowl and toss gently - try not to crush the beans.
  5. If your beans were nice and cold, you can eat it now.  Or, refrigerate for an hour up to a few days! 
  6. Serve with bread and butter or crackers to complete the protein (other foods will also work!!)
I would have loved to add any of the following to my salad:
  • diced ham
  • shredded chicken
  • feta, goat cheese, Parmesan
  • chopped avocado
  • onion of some type (maybe green onions or chives?)
  • leftover cold rice (complete that protein! Add extra dressing to soak in)
 

Tuesday, 10 July 2012

Cucumber Dill Salad

My favorite thing to do with just a couple of garden fresh cucumbers.  Originally found on Allrecipes.com.


Cucumber Dill Salad

cucumbers (the sauce below will cover 2-3 medium)
1 onion
1C white vinegar
1/2C water
3/4C white sugar
1T dried dill, or 2 fresh or dried heads

  1. Slice cucumbers and onion very thinly.  The slicing blade of a food processor should work well for this.  I don't have that blade, so I used the slicing side of my box grater.  Perfect.
  2. Bring remaining ingredients to a simmer.
  3. Pour simmering liquid over cucumbers and onions.  Toss well, and press down into juice.
  4. Cover and refrigerate until cold, stirring once or twice if your cukes are not fully under the liquid.  Keeps for days refrigerated!

Monday, 9 July 2012

The Great Pectin Debate - liquid vs. powdered - with Jalapeno Jelly Experiment

Jalapeno Jelly - a bit too green...


So, it was inevitable - soon after starting to can, I start reading recipes that called for ONLY liquid pectin, or ONLY powdered pectin.  I checked online, in my Blue Ball Cookbook, and everyone says NOT INTERCHANGEABLE!!! 


But why?  Liquid pectin is usually well over 2x more expensive, plus you need more of it, which makes the cost go up even more.  Powdered pectin can be bought bulk in a jar, which makes it even cheaper than per box.  I wanted to know for sure whether or not I could convert a liquid pectin recipe to a powdered one.  So I did a little experiment.


Below is a recipe for Jalapeno Jelly from my friend Naomi S. - basically the one from the Ball Blue Book, but with the addition of a bell pepper to give the jelly more chunks. (I didn't have a bell pepper on hand, so my jelly is rather chunk-less)  I had enough jalapenos to make 1 batch, so I divided it into 2 half-batches.  One would use the original liquid pectin just as the recipe states, and the other I would try to convert to powder.


Short Story - both batches turned out perfectly.  Below I will list both recipes and you can take your pick!!


Longer story - it is true that you cannot just substitute liquid and powdered pectin, because they work in different ways.  You have to change the recipe.
  • For liquid pectin, you bring all ingredients to a boil, boil for 10 minutes, then squeeze in the liquid pectin, boil for 1 minute, then process.
  • For powdered pectin you bring all ingredients (including powdered pectin) except sugar to a boil.  add sugar all at once, boil 1 minute, then process.
 So that's what I did.
  • For the original jelly recipe, I brought it all to a boil for 10 minutes, added liquid pectin, boiled 1 minute, poured into jars, processed.  Jelly set on the sides of the pan while I was pouring, perfectly stiff jelly after boiling bath.  
  • For my experiment recipe I brought everything except the sugar to a boil, added sugar, returned to a boil for 1 minute, poured into jars, processed.  Jelly set on the sides of the pan while I was pouring, jelly still slightly liquid straight out of the bath, set very firm by morning.
Fini!  Code cracked, mystery solved.  I'm still not sure why they need 2 kinds of pectin, or why one would be preferable to the other.  I've heard that the powdered pectin lends a dark/muddy tint, and it certainly looked that way in the pan - darker than the liquid pectin batch.  But the processed jars look the same to me.  I did use the food coloring to help with the color on both batches.  Cooked jalapenos are not very pretty.  Think 'overdone broccoli'.


Please feel free to use the recipe below to make Jalapeno Jelly out of liquid or powdered pectin, and enjoy the fruits of your labor!! Another bonus of using the powdered pectin, is that you don't have to cook 'n' stir for 10 minutes!!



Jalapeno Jelly - using liquid pectin
8 large or 12 small jalapenos (12 oz)

1 whole bell pepper, seeded (orange or red preferably)

6 C sugar
2C white vinegar, divided

2 pouches liquid pectin 
3-5 drops green food coloring

  1. Remove the tops and seeds of all peppers (keep 1 jalapeno with the seeds in for mild heat, more if you like). Grind all seeded peppers in food processor or blender with 1C of the vinegar.  Add peppers, SUGAR and remaining vinegar into a sauce pan.  
  2. Bring to a rolling boil for 10 minutes.  Add pectin and return to rolling boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat.  Stir in food coloring, 1-2 drops at a time (I used like 8 drops accidentally, and it's WAAAAYYYY too green and fake looking :-(
  3. Pour into hot jars, adjust lids and process in boiling water bath for 10 minutes.


Jalapeno Jelly - using powdered pectin
8 large or 12 small jalapenos (12 oz)

1 whole bell pepper, seeded (orange or red preferably)

6 C sugar - pre-measured into a bowl

2C white vinegar, divided

1 box powdered pectin (6 tablespoons from a bulk jar)

3-5 drops green food coloring

  1.  Remove the tops and seeds of all peppers (keep 1 jalapeno with the seeds in for mild heat, more if you like). Grind all seeded peppers in food processor or blender with 1C of the vinegar.  Add peppers, PECTIN and remaining vinegar into a sauce pan. 
  2. Bring to a rolling boil, add sugar all at once, then stir until melted.  If your jelly starts to set immediately (mine did) you might find it helpful to use a whisk.  But it will all melt eventually, so don't worry.  Bring back to a rolling boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat.  Stir in food coloring 1-2 drops at a time (I used like 8 drops accidentally, and it's WAAAAYYYY too green and fake looking :-(
  3. Pour into hot jars, adjust lids, and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

Wednesday, 4 July 2012

Sweet Garden Relish

Hot jars waiting for labels

I based my version on a recipe here.  I added a couple of spices, and some squash.  Otherwise, the recipe is about the same.

Utensils:
food processor (or a knife, cutting board and lots of time)

jar lifter
magnetic lid lifter
funnel
ladle/measuring cup
wooden spoon

Veggies:
6C chopped cucumbers
3C chopped yellow squash
3 red/green bell peppers
2 onions
1/2C canning/pickling salt
cold tap water

Pickling Spices:
2C apple cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon celery seed
1 Tablespoon mustard seeds
1/2 Tablespoon peppercorns (I used mixed colored)
3 1/2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon citric acid (optional, to protect color)
1/4 teaspoon turmeric (optional)

  1. Wash and dry 10 half pint jars and lids.
  2. Run all your veggies through a food processor until your desired dice.  Chunky or fine, it's up to you.  Place them in a large bowl and mix well.  Sprinkle salt over all, cover with cold tap water and soak for 2 hours.
  3. Start your water bath canner heating on the stove - cover it to speed the process up.
  4. Drain veggies in a colander then rinse well with cold water - DO NOT SKIP THE RINSING! I nearly ruined a batch by forgetting to rinse the salt out.  After the veggies taste unsalted again, leave in the colander to drain for 20 minutes or so.  We want as much water out as possible - you can press and squeeze to speed this up.
  5. Meanwhile, mix together all the pickling spices in a large pot and bring to a simmer.
  6. When the veggies are drained, add to the pickling spices pot.  Stir well and bring to a simmer.
  7. Bring a small pot of water to a boil, turn off, and add your lids.
  8. Your water bath should be boiling by now (if not, turn off your relish and then bring it back to a simmer when your water is boiling)  I like to use my water bath to sanitize my jars, so put your 10 jars down into the boiling water - it helps to hold your jar on the end of a wooden spoon, then lower it down slowly.  
  9. After 3-5 minutes sanitizing, you are ready to pack.  Use your jar lifter to bring out 1 jar and pour the boiling water back into the canner.  Set it on a dry washcloth or towel near your stove, relish, lids and rings.  Use a funnel and ladle to fill your jar to about halfway up the threads - leaving 1/2" headspace.  If your relish is chunky, run a chopstick up and down the inside a few times to release bubbles.
  10. Wipe the rim with a wet washcloth, use the magnetic lid lifter to bring a lid out of the hot water, place on jar and add a ring - only fingertip tight.  Set the packed jar on the counter near your waterbath.
  11. Fill all jars the same way - I got 9 half-pints from my batch.  I always prep an extra jar or 2 just in case.
  12. Add your jars to the waterbath, then wait for it to return to a good rolling boil.  Time it for 10 minutes.
  13. Remove jars to a thick towel or cooling rack - they must not touch, and need to be undisturbed for 12 hours.
  14. After 12 hours, check for seal - the lid should not pop up and down.  Any that are not sealed may be reprocessed, or just stored in the fridge and eaten first.

Eat on hotdogs, burgers, brauts, chips - anything!




Sweet Garden Relish

Hot jars waiting for labels

I based my version on a recipe here.  I added a couple of spices, and some squash.  Otherwise, the recipe is about the same.

Utensils:
food processor (or a knife, cutting board and lots of time)

jar lifter
magnetic lid lifter
funnel
ladle/measuring cup
wooden spoon

Veggies:
6C chopped cucumbers
3C chopped yellow squash
3 red/green bell peppers
2 onions
1/2C canning/pickling salt
cold tap water

Pickling Spices:
2C apple cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon celery seed
1 Tablespoon mustard seeds
1/2 Tablespoon peppercorns (I used mixed colored)
3 1/2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon citric acid (optional, to protect color)
1/4 teaspoon turmeric (optional)

  1. Wash and dry 10 half pint jars and lids.
  2. Run all your veggies through a food processor until your desired dice.  Chunky or fine, it's up to you.  Place them in a large bowl and mix well.  Sprinkle salt over all, cover with cold tap water and soak for 2 hours.
  3. Start your water bath canner heating on the stove - cover it to speed the process up.
  4. Drain veggies in a colander then rinse well with cold water - DO NOT SKIP THE RINSING! I nearly ruined a batch by forgetting to rinse the salt out.  After the veggies taste unsalted again, leave in the colander to drain for 20 minutes or so.  We want as much water out as possible - you can press and squeeze to speed this up.
  5. Meanwhile, mix together all the pickling spices in a large pot and bring to a simmer.
  6. When the veggies are drained, add to the pickling spices pot.  Stir well and bring to a simmer.
  7. Bring a small pot of water to a boil, turn off, and add your lids.
  8. Your water bath should be boiling by now (if not, turn off your relish and then bring it back to a simmer when your water is boiling)  I like to use my water bath to sanitize my jars, so put your 10 jars down into the boiling water - it helps to hold your jar on the end of a wooden spoon, then lower it down slowly.  
  9. After 3-5 minutes sanitizing, you are ready to pack.  Use your jar lifter to bring out 1 jar and pour the boiling water back into the canner.  Set it on a dry washcloth or towel near your stove, relish, lids and rings.  Use a funnel and ladle to fill your jar to about halfway up the threads - leaving 1/2" headspace.  If your relish is chunky, run a chopstick up and down the inside a few times to release bubbles.
  10. Wipe the rim with a wet washcloth, use the magnetic lid lifter to bring a lid out of the hot water, place on jar and add a ring - only fingertip tight.  Set the packed jar on the counter near your waterbath.
  11. Fill all jars the same way - I got 9 half-pints from my batch.  I always prep an extra jar or 2 just in case.
  12. Add your jars to the waterbath, then wait for it to return to a good rolling boil.  Time it for 10 minutes.
  13. Remove jars to a thick towel or cooling rack - they must not touch, and need to be undisturbed for 12 hours.
  14. After 12 hours, check for seal - the lid should not pop up and down.  Any that are not sealed may be reprocessed, or just stored in the fridge and eaten first.

Eat on hotdogs, burgers, brauts, chips - anything!




Garden's Bounty - Garden Fried Rice

I'm excited about this recipe.  It's actually not all that thrilling - kind of what I call "plain" food.  You taste the ingredients, the spices are not super rich.  But I had several goals in mind when I came up with it, and this recipe served me well.  In the future, I'll try to mark other recipes that also meet similar goals.
  • Use up zucchini and squash from the garden
  • Be very economical, which means I had to have things on hand and use no meat.
  • Be filling and diet friendly.  I did not measure or do a calorie count, but this recipe is heavy on veggies, heavy on whole grains, light/no fats or dairy (which I understand are part of a healthy diet, but I've already eaten plenty of those today)
This would make a vegetarian main dish to serve about 3-4 very hungry people, or a side dish for 5-6.  It's super basic - wide open to changes.  Halved cherry tomatoes would be great with the squashes (mine aren't ready yet), jalapenos, banana peppers, or cayenne with the onions would make it pop.  Any other ripe veggies that you would normally saute or stir fry would fit right in.  Salsa on top would swing it mexican, without requiring sour cream or cheese.  Or go ahead and add shredded extra sharp cheddar to a plate full - believe me, I would have LOVED to eat this dish like that!

I recommend a very large skillet - look into getting the 13.25" from Lodge Cast Iron if you cook like this a lot - that's what I have.  It's worth the investment.  Also, a good, sharp metal-blade spatula that can stand up to heavy scraping to keep your food from tearing as you stir.

Garden Fried Rice
Serves 4-6


This entire recipe is cooked in the same skillet, in 2 shifts.  The ingredients marked with an * came from my garden and farm.

First Shift:
EVOO spray
3-4 small/medium yellow summer squash*
3-4 small/medium zucchini*
big handful garlic chives in 2" pieces*
2 cloves pressed garlic*
salt, pepper, garlic & onion powder, to taste

Second Shift:
2-3 teaspoons olive oil or EVOO spray

1 onion, halved and thinly sliced*
2C cold, cooked rice (preferably brown)
2C cooked/canned pinto beans (rinse well if canned in salt)
big handful basil leaves, slivered*
2-3 eggs*
salt, pepper, onion & garlic powder, to taste
chive blossoms, or other edible flowers (optional)

  1.  Slice your zucchini and squash into about 1/8" pieces - they don't need to be paper thin.  Spray a very large skillet with EVOO and heat on medium/high.  Add the squash and begin to sautee.  After a few minutes, when squash begins to brown, add the garlic chives and pressed garlic and season with salt, pepper, onion & garlic powder to taste.  When squash is done to your liking, remove to a large serving bowl.
  2. Pour oil or spray more EVOO into skillet - the rice likes to have a bit more oil to sizzle in, but you can do without it.  Add onions and sautee for about 2 minutes, or until beginning to wilt and scrape up bits from the bottom.  Add the beans and heat through, about 2-3 more minutes.  Crumble cold rice into skillet, and mix well, breaking up any clumps with your spatula - it's fine if the beans get a bit chopped up.
  3. When everything is heated through, scrape the mixture into one side of the skillet.  Move the skillet so the burner is under the empty side.  Spray a touch of EVOO, and crack in your eggs.  Let them set up for about 30-45 seconds before gently breaking the yolk and scrambling the egg lightly.  Let set for about a minute total before scrambling the eggs together - they should start to look like a fried egg, but then you change your mind.  Scramble until the eggs are nearly done but still very moist, then pull the rice down and toss all together.  Add basil and seasonings here and continue to toss.  Taste and adjust.
  4. When the rice looks nearly perfect, add the cooked squash and toss well.  Now, let your skillet sit and sizzle for a minute before giving it a toss, and let it sit again.  This gives the bottom a chance to brown nicely before getting mixed in.
  5. Pour Garden Fried Rice back into your large serving bowl and garnish with flowers.  Serve with a smile!

Tuesday, 3 July 2012

Garlic Dill Pickles - for 12 pints

This recipe is from Joel Johnson's mom, Debbie.  It makes crisp, crunchy dill pickles - sliced or whole!!





Helpful Utensils:
Funnel
Ladle or Measuring Cup
Magnetic lid Lifter
Jar Lifter

Stovetop:
3qt water
1qt apple cider vinegar
1 cup canning/pickling salt (or plain non-iodized)
Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer.  Pack jars while simmering.

Jars:
12 pint jars, lids and rings
8-12 cucumbers (depending on size) well scrubbed
12 cloves of garlic, peeled and sliced in half
fresh or dried dill heads - see note in recipe

Prep:
Bring pickling liquid to a boil, reduce to a simmer.


Bring water bath canner to a boil.  This recipe processes quickly, so I just used my biggest stock pot and worked in batches.

Wash jars and lids thoroughly.  Place jars in boiling canning-water for a few minutes to sterilize, then remove to a thick towel to cool.  Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil, turn off, and place lids in the water to sterilize and remain clean.

For dill - Dill flowers are not as strongly flavored as dill seeds.  If you have flowering heads, use about 1 whole head per jar.  If your dill heads have already gone to seed, break off about 4 small seed-stalks per jar.

Slice your cucumbers (see below for whole pickle instructions) and be sure to discard the stalk and flowering ends.

Packing:
Place a few slices of cucumber on the bottom of a jar.  Add 1/2 the dill and 1/2 a piece of garlic (if you are using 1 whole head, try to tuck it down the side of the jar - it's pretty!)  Fill the jar to the bottom of the threads with cucumber slices.  Try to alternate the slices so they are not stuck together in stacks - there needs to be room for the liquid to circulate.   Add the other 1/2 of the garlic and dill on top.

Use the funnel and a ladle to add simmering pickling liquid to the jar.  Fill to about 1/2 way up the threads - leaving around 1/2" headspace.  Be sure the cucumbers are under the liquid - remove a slice or 2 if necessary.

Use a wooden spoon handle, chopstick, or other long thin utensil to slide up and down around the inside of the jar to remove bubbles stuck between the slices.  Press the cucumbers down to push them under the liquid again.

Wipe the rim with a hot, wet washcloth, place a hot lid on top, and tighten the ring finger-tight.  Do not over tighten.

Processing:
Place jars (as many as you can fit) into the boiling water canner.  Once water has returned to a rolling boil, time for 5 minutes.  Use the jar lifter to remove jars to a thick, folded towel or a cooling rack.  Be sure the jars are not touching, and will not get splashed by water, or need to be moved for 12 hours.  After 12 hours, check for seal by tapping the top with a spoon or your fingernail - it should have a high pitched ring, not a dull thud.  The top should be flexed down toward the jar, and should not move when pressed.  Any un-sealed jars can be re-processed within 24 hours, or just keep them in the fridge.

Curing:
Pickles should be allowed to cure for 8 weeks or longer before eating.  Mark the lid with process date and earliest opening date.

For Whole Pickles:
Follow the recipe exactly, except the whole pickles must be first soaked in ice water for a minimum of 2 hours, and up to 8 hours.  Be sure to trim off both ends (the stem is tough, and the blossom end can harbor bacteria)

NOTE - The USDA recommends processing pickles for 15 minutes.  This original recipe states 5 minutes only.  Personally, I feel confident that the amount of vinegar and salt will preserve the pickles and make them safe to eat - the processing is only to make the jar air-tight enough to prevent new bacteria from entering the jar.  If you process for 15 minutes, the pickles may or may not retain their crunch.  Proceed as your conscience dictates.